About Alice Trosclair

Alice has been teaching for nine years. She currently teaches English III, English Language and Composition AP, and English Literature and Composition AP. She lives with her husband and son in south Louisiana. She also has hundreds of "adopted" children.

I am surrounded by brilliant minds every day, and while many of them are sitting in the desks in front of me, I cannot help, but be in awe of my coworkers. They are amazing. Teachers are a mixed and match collection of degrees including Bachelors, Masters, and PHDs. Most of them are parents. Some of them are coaches. They make jewelry, sell makeup, and some even write to make a little extra money. These wonderful people are here in classrooms making a difference in every child’s life they come across for so much less than what they deserve.

In Dead Poet’s Society, Neal asks Mr. Keating, “How can you stand being here?” and Mr. Keating replies, “Because I love teaching, I don’t want to be anywhere else.” I look around at my incredible colleagues and think similar thoughts. She could be running a company, but here she is teaching economics. He could be working for NASA, yet he is teaching physics. I often wonder if the public realizes how not only brilliant educators really are, but what they could be doing besides education. No one goes into education because they cannot do anything else despite what the media and politicians want you to think. The most caring, educated people in the world are found in our classrooms.

Some have asked us did you give up your dreams. We all have larger than life aspirations when we are young. Some of us wanted to be firemen; others want to be superheroes, and a few of us knew we were made to teach. Did we give up our dreams to paint or land on the moon? For some of us, yes, we did, but there is no greater love than sharing our hobbies and loves with the next generation. Sharing our field with our students ensures that Shakespeare will live on, or Einstein’s theories will continue to be used. We feel so much pride when a student enters the field of science, English, or business because of something we brought into our classroom. It is through these students, our original dreams live on.

The best of the best enter education because these people see the bigger picture. Click To Tweet

Because we have teachers that could be millionaires or Nobel Prize-winning novelists, our students benefit. The best of the best enter education because these people see the bigger picture. We are put on this Earth to help each other, to ensure that the next generation has the skills to survive our complex world, and to care for each other. If teachers did not do this, who would? I know what you are thinking, the parents. Would they? Would they truly, if there was no one to teach the parents? In a world, where it takes two incomes and technology is constantly turned to as a “babysitter” would the world be the same without educators? Perhaps, though I doubt it. People who enter the field of education give up time with their families and children to take care of other people’s children. We depend on other educators to help raise our kids. This is why we understand the importance of giving it all we got for our students because we know down the hall or across town someone is helping our child.

This is why we understand the importance of giving it all we got for our students because we know… Click To Tweet

I am simply in awe of the people that enter education. I see us torn to shreds by the media and the government. Despite all this, our educators plow on. They adapt to change will constant flexibility and more often than not a smile. They lose sleep over other people’s children. They go to training even though they have a degree. They inspire children without social media, computers, or phones. Could you imagine what these teachers could be if they weren’t in the classroom? They could change the world. Wait, they do that anyway. Every. Single. Day.
For all my colleagues around the country and the world. You inspire me.

I often wonder if the public realizes how not only brilliant educators really are, but what they could be doing besides education.

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